Greatness and the irrelevance of talent in geoff colvins what it takes to be great

Dec 02, Robert rated it it was amazing Colvin set out to answer this question: In this context, I am reminded of Thomas Edison's observation that "vision without execution is hallucination. Colvin duly acknowledges that deliberate practice "is a large concept, and to say that it explains everything would be simplistic and reductive. What exactly needs to be practiced?

Greatness and the irrelevance of talent in geoff colvins what it takes to be great

Intelligence is important, but not in the way we typically think. Instead, personally designed practice regimens which he spends the middle part of the book explainingin which we are periodically evaluated by a mentor, teacher, or other source of insightful feedback, allow us to work on a skill set just beyond our current comfort zones.

Much of this work is solitary, and physically and mentally taxing.

Secrets of greatness: Practice and hard work bring success - October 30,

Excellence can be attained only by spending countless hours over many years doing this kind of grueling practice, Colvin argues. There are no shortcuts, and the most direct route is to start young and keep working maniacally as one ages. Excellence, he writes, is much more equal-opportunity than we thought, but most of us are not equal to its challenge.

After meandering for several chapters through what does NOT lead to high performance, Colvin finally gets around to arguing that the secret is "deliberate practice.

Beyond that, Colvin mixes apples and oranges in terms of what "talent" means.

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Another confusion is the difference between playing games and making great discoveries. While he gives anecdotes to show that you can train anyone to be a chess grand master, it seems absurd to argue that you can train anyone to be Einstein.

Only a small part of the book is devoted to how to get better at useful tasks like doctors reading X-rays correctly and here his amazing insight is that experienced workers are better at this than new trainees.The central focus of Geoff Colvin's article "What It Takes To Be Great" published October 30th, in Fortune Magazine, is research on the fact that natural talent doesn't come naturally, but that it comes from hard work and dedicated practice.

"Geoff Colvin has written a fascinating study of great achievers from Mozart to Tiger Woods, and he has brilliantly highlighted the fact that great effort equals great success.

Secrets of greatness: Practice and hard work bring success - October 30,

I agree, and Talent Is Overrated is not only inspiring but enlightening. In a transformed economy, Geoff proves that to a far greater degree than most of us ever imagined, we already have what it takes to be great.

Now it’s up to us to build it and use it for all it’s worth – and Geoff shows how+ connections. The central focus of Geoff Colvin's article "What It Takes To Be Great" published October 30th, in Fortune Magazine, is research on the fact that natural talent doesn't come naturally, but that it comes from hard work and dedicated practice.

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Talent is Overrated has 14, ratings and reviews. Robert said: Colvin set out to answer this question: What does great performance require? "What It Takes to Be Great." Geoff Colvin offered new evidence that top performers in any field People tend to assume they had some unnatural talent or passion that led them to greatness.

In 4/5.

Greatness and the irrelevance of talent in geoff colvins what it takes to be great

What makes them great You will be reading an article by Geoff Colvin called "What it Takes to Be Great." In his article Colvin: liberating news is that greatness isn't reserved for a small few who--gifted with natural talent--were born to be great".

What it Takes to be Great? by Yvonne Keaton on Prezi